This work is an installation in two parts, focused on both the direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic impacts on reef systems globally. As oceanographic temperatures continue to increase, the geographic range of ocean habitat suitable for the growth of coral reef ecosystems is shifting and becoming reduced worldwide, with many ecosystems seeing increased levels of bleaching and reef die-out. Furthermore, reefs located near areas commonly exploited by humans may be subjected to damaging fishing practices such as trawling, or be exposed to poisonous fertilisers and chemicals from local primary producers. Coupled with the waste that we fill our oceans with, these factors can result in severe damage to the already vulnerable reef systems. This work focuses on these human impacts on the reef, and highlights the irreversible damage being done today. This work questions the relations of nature and culture, serving as a stark warning of the environmental degradation of our marine habitat.

  Poison   2017  450 x 120 x 120cm  plastic, stainless steel, led lights  photographer Grant Hancock

Poison

2017

450 x 120 x 120cm

plastic, stainless steel, led lights

photographer Grant Hancock

  Poison  (detail)

Poison (detail)

  Poison  (detail)

Poison (detail)

  Poison   photographer Grant Hancock

Poison

photographer Grant Hancock

  Impact   2017  240 x 150 x 150cm  sea sponge, enamel, galvanized steel, nylon, lead  photographer Grant Hancock

Impact

2017

240 x 150 x 150cm

sea sponge, enamel, galvanized steel, nylon, lead

photographer Grant Hancock

Impact (detail)

  Impact  (detail)

Impact (detail)

  Orange bag   2017  50 x 30 x 20cm  plastic, weed  photographer Grant Hancock

Orange bag

2017

50 x 30 x 20cm

plastic, weed

photographer Grant Hancock